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Methane and diesel compounds found near fracking sites in Wyoming

From Green Right Now Reports A second major sampling of water near gas wells in Pavilion, Wyo., has found a range of gases and contaminants. Wind River Reservation in Wyoming...

From Green Right Now Reports

A second major sampling of water near gas wells in Pavilion,  Wyo., has found a range of gases and contaminants.

Wind River Reservation in Wyoming where natural gas wells have reportedly contaminated drinking water.

The testing of a monitoring well near where several residents say gas drilling has ruined their drinking water supplies found methane, ethane, diesel compounds and phenol, according to news reports.

Gas drillers use diesel compounds in hydraulic fracturing to release natural gas from shale deposits deep below the surface.

Pavilion, where several residents have complained of ill effects from gas air emissions and undrinkable water supplies, is one of a handful of sites in the U.S. where it appears that fracking operations may have contaminated well water.

Encana Corp., the Canadian driller operating in the Pavilion region, has said it is not responsible for the contamination, but that some of the compounds occur naturally.

The recent testing results, by US Geological Survey working in tandem with the EPA, were “generally consistent,” with the EPA’s headline-making findings last year that identified similar contaminants in the water, according to Bloomberg News.

Pavilion, a tiny town of fewer than 200 people within the Wind River Indian Reservation in west central Wyoming, is surrounded by more than 80 gas wells.

Since 2009, the EPA has been sampling homeowner wells and later testing specially drilled monitoring wells to analyze the groundwater in the heavily drilled area.

Many residents have been advised not to drink their well water until further notice.

For more information on the EPA’s investigation in the area, see the agency’s website on Pavilion.

 


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