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Arrive Alive Tour Teaches Students About Distracted Driving

"You don't need to have your phone on you all the time and when you're driving it's not safe to be looking at your phone," said Tyler Herbstreth with UNITE.
FREDERICK, Md. - Studies show drivers are six times more likely to crash while texting and driving than drinking and driving.
With statistics like that one national awareness group brought the arrive alive tour to Frederick Community College to show students the dangers of distracted driving.

For younger generations texting is a way of life but when texting and driving are combined the studies show the results can be fatal

Students at Frederick Community College tested their skills behind the wheel while texting and driving.

"You just ran into that sign," said Tyler Herbstreth with UNITE to a FCC student.

It's the Arrive Alive Tour sponsored by UNITE, a national health and wellness organization teaching students the dangers of distracted driving. 

"The younger generation has kind of growing up around cell phones and it's always been at our fingers tips so we need to educate them so it can wait. You don't need to have your phone on you all the time and when you're driving it's not safe to be looking at your phone," said Tyler Herbstreth with UNITE.

There was also a car simulator that took students on a virtual ride showing them what it's like driving under the influence or while texting and driving and how quickly you can lose control behind the wheel.

"Wow, it was very eye opening," said Shanika Young, sophomore at Frederick Community College. "I don't drink and drive so I've never had to experience that personally but it also shows you that not only are you taking your life into, you're not only putting your life in danger but you're putting other's lives in danger and that's not okay."

There were also green thumb rings engaged with "texting kills" for students to take with them. Some say it's another reminder that texting can wait.

"Like if you get tempted to text and drive what you can do is, you'll be tempted to look down at that and remember that it's probably not a good idea to do that," said Young. "You can send that text message when you're you know parked in a parking lot or wait until a later moment when you're not driving to send it."

Representatives from the Health Department and police were also on campus on Wednesday talking about the dangers of drunk driving.
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