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Common Core Standards Changing Report Cards

"I think most people feel that it's actually a little more specific, it helps communicate exactly what's going on in the classroom, what's being assessed and then what's coming home to you," said Jones.
HAGERSTOWN, Md. - As a part of an ongoing effort by Washington County Schools to meet state core education standards, report cards will look a bit different this year for elementary students, one that meets state standards.

Instead of getting the traditional "A" and "B" letter grade, now students are getting numbers from one to four on Common Core subjects.

Lead teacher at Emma K. Doub Elementary School, Jesse Orth said, "We do have the numbering which is based on the standards based reporting, which are those common core standards. And we're assessing where kids' progress is based on those standards.”

He continued, “And the letter grade is also on the report card and that was really a way for us to bridge that new divide with parents and with our community, because they're comfortable with letter grades.”

Common Core Standards have been fully implemented in both language arts and math in the Washington County Elementary Schools, and this term, the report cards are reflecting those standards.

“A four would actually be exceeding the standards which would mean that their performance is showing that they're doing things that may be beyond what that standard is addressing," said Orth.

A three means the student is appropriately meeting the standard. A two says that the student is approaching meeting the standard, and a one is where the student is not progressing towards the standard.

Parent teacher conferences at Emma K. Doub were on October 29, and report cards will be handed out on November 8.

Lead teacher, Jesse Orth said he doesn't expect too many questions or concerns about the report cards after the one-on-one's with parents and teachers.

And parents, like Christa Jones, are giving the new scale an "A.”

 
"I think most people feel that it's actually a little more specific, it helps communicate exactly what's going on in the classroom, what's being assessed and then what's coming home to you," said Jones.

This mom says, the grade is actually giving her a better idea of where her daughters stand with their class work.
 
"Not in the sense that I'm disappointed, but more I think that it's very informative as reporting to me," Jones said.

And both parents and teachers agree, this is a great transition year, using both the number and letter scale as they continue to implement more Common Core subjects. Eventually, the district will also implement social studies and science. 

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