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Controversy Boils at Local West Virginia Landfill

"You have types of soils, and then you have lying faults and rivers which are running right into the Chesapeake Bay to Washington D.C.," said Mauck. "The Potomac River could be full of radio activity, our water could be poisoned, and the state is as good as the water we have."

BERKELEY COUNTY, W.Va. - The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection recently notified local landfills that they could accept natural gas waste from surrounding areas. However local officials say they were never notified, and now they’re upset and concerned.

As a council woman for the past two years in Berkeley County, Elaine Mauck said she tries to represent the public's best interest and health.

Now, with a landfill in Berkeley County potentially accepting Marcellus Shale waste material, she said she’s worried it could impact the health and wellbeing of residents in the Panhandle.

"Most of them are very upset because we are looking at the general health of the community,” said Mauck. "We are the second highest area of population. We are also an economic engine for West Virginia. We do not need to be a superfund and super hazardous area."

She said if the waste is collected here, the ground water could be contaminated through out the area.

"You have types of soils, and then you have lying faults and rivers which are running right into the Chesapeake Bay to Washington D.C.," said Mauck. "The Potomac River could be full of radio activity, our water could be poisoned, and the state is as good as the water we have."

Now Mauck is urging Eastern Panhandle citizens to reach out to the West Virginia Public Service Commission to stop the unlimited dumping of the radioactive waste in the Mountain State by this Wednesday night.

"They have been very supportive of local hearings regarding the electricity. They have had local hearings in everything else, so I like to encourage everybody to please put their comments in. In that they able to affect the decision here,” said Mauck.

The DEP released a statement saying disposing of drill cuttings from horizontal well development in approved solid waste facilities is mandated by law under the 2011 Horizontal Well Control Act. It is the best option available for drill cuttings from an environmental standpoint, because landfills are regulated by the state.

Click here to submit a comment to PSC.

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