Boy Battling Leukemia Gets Wish Granted

Boy Battling Leukemia Gets Wish Granted

"With these wishes, it's finally that one moment that the child and that family can just forget that they have these illnesses and all these diseases and things that are going on."

 HAGERSTOWN, Md.- Randy Parker is your typical six-year-old kid who has been a joy to his parents his whole life.

"The day he was born, it was like my best friend was born," said Rick Parker, Randy's father. "I always hung out with him and always go places with him."

However, just before Randy's fourth birthday, he was diagnosed with leukemia.

"It nearly killed me," said Raelynn Parker, Randy's mother. "It felt like my world was ending."

"Cancer doesn't hit home until its at your doorstep, then you know it's there," added Rick. "You see about it in the news and people in general, but you don't really think about it until it happens to you and your family directly."

The parkers say they have had to change their daily routine completely, but things are progressively getting better. Earlier this week Randy wrapped up his chemotherapy, his hair has grown back and he's back home from the hospital.

"He finished his treatment up on Monday," Raelynn added. 

"Feels like a big weight being lifted off of you," Rick said.

"For three years I've been in the hospital," Randy said. "But now I'm out of it."

The Make-A-Wish Foundation heard about Randy's story and wanted to make sure an entire day was dedicated to him.

"With these wishes, it's finally that one moment that the child and that family can just forget that they have these illnesses and all these diseases and things that are going on, and they can just be," said Lindsey McCormick, a Wish Granting volunteer.

Randy and his family started their day with lunch at Olive Garden. His day continued with a $1,250 shopping spree at all of his favorite stores, and a limousine escorting them all around Hagerstown.

His parents say Randy is proof that anybody can overcome obstacles no matter how old you may be. After battling leukemia for the past three years, the Make-A-Wish foundation says the reason they do their jobs, is to bring a smile to the kids' faces.

"It's amazing," McCormick said. "This is quite possibly one of the most rewarding things I've ever done in my life."

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