"Revenge Porn Bill" Passes in the Md. House of Delegates

"Revenge Porn Bill" Passes in the Md. House of Delegates

"I think that there would be nothing more horrifying than to get a Twitter or Facebook with your picture up there in a, how would you say, compromising position."
FREDERICK, Md. - Lawmakers in Maryland are looking to crack down on so-called "revenge porn" and could soon increase the penalty for offenders. The Maryland House of Delegates unanimously passed a bill last week addressing this issue.

Some lawmakers in the Maryland General Assembly want to make sure pictures people intended to stay private don't end up on the Internet for everyone to see. 

"I think that there would be nothing more horrifying than to get a Twitter or Facebook with your picture up there in a, how would you say, compromising position," said Del. Kathy Afzali, (R) - Frederick County.

Afzali is co-sponsoring the "revenge porn bill." It would make it illegal for someone to post sexually-suggestive or naked pictures of another person on the Internet with the intent of causing that person emotional distress.

Those at the Frederick City Police Department say the bill will help them by adding another charge if someone sends out sexually-suggestive pictures or video of another person.

"I think this bill is a positive step for law enforcement. It's going to help us combat this type of crime when it occurs. I think with various technical advances, this type of crime is increasing. People are more apt to post things without thinking about it sometimes," said Cpl. Aaron Lapp, with the Frederick City Police Department.

The bill would also create penalties of up to two years in prison and a $5,000 fine for anyone convicted of revenge porn.

"I keep telling my daughters your stupid things could mean that someone's going to take a picture of it and that picture of it could stick with you for the next 40 years and could go to your employers and when you go to apply for jobs and those sorts of things," Afzali said.

"It this is a law, it's going to create another tool in our toolbox if you will for us to investigate crimes," Lapp said.

The bill now goes to the Maryland Senate, where bill sponsors are confident it will pass. You can read it by clicking here.
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