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Monrovia Town Center Hearing Packs Winchester Hall

"They want to take basically 1,500 new homes, carve it out from the farmland and dump it next to our community. It's going to more than triple the size of our town," said Steven McKay of Monrovia, the president of Residents Against Landsdale Expansion.

FREDERICK COUNTY, Md. - It was a packed room at Winchester Hall Wednesday night, but despite emotions running high it was quiet. The public was instructed to wave hands, and refrain from cheering and clapping to keep the meeting running in a timely manner.

The Planning Commission has heard comments from hundreds who are against the Monrovia Town Center, including more than 1,500 houses, as well as commercial properties.

"They want to take basically 1,500 new homes, carve it out from the farmland and dump it next to our community. It's going to more than triple the size of our town," said Steven McKay of Monrovia, the president of Residents Against Landsdale Expansion.

Residents are pushing for the Planning Commission to say no when they make a recommendation to the Frederick County Board of Commissioners on November 20th.

"I'm for sustainable growth, but not over development. Our roads can't take the heavy traffic, there dangerous, now our schools are overcrowded," said Monrovia Resident Stan Mordensky.

Hundreds of residents echoed the same concerns, the local schools already over crowded and the roads in no condition for increased traffic.

"It used to be a car every 15 to 20 minutes and now it's one every 15 to 20 seconds," said Jeff Green of Monrovia.

But, not everyone is in opposition to the Monrovia Town Center.

"I'm the minority here tonight, but I know there are others who do support it. As a resident I'd like to be able to shop closer to home, and I like the idea of walk able communities," said Annette Breiling, an Ijamsville resident.

Many who live in Monrovia say each house sits on at least an acre, and some remember when they weren't allowed to install street lights because the cows didn't like it at night.

Now, five to ten houses per acre could be coming. The Planning Commission previously said five to ten houses on an acre was the State's request, but a letter from the State Department of Planning was presented at Wednesday's hearing, and clarifies that decision is made by local government.

Developers’ say they would provide some funding to make sure there would be enough room for all the students in the area, and to repair roadways. Many say it wouldn't be enough funding and they fear taxes will increase.

The public will have another chance to comment and voice their concerns to the Planning Commission on November 6.

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