33°F
Sponsored by

O'Malley Delivers Final State of the State Address

"Our goals as an administration have remained constant and true, to strengthen and grow the ranks of our middle class including our family owned business and our family farms, to improve public safety and public education and to expand opportunity to more people rather than fewer," said Gov. Martin O'Malley.

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - On Thursday, Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley delivered his final State of the State address before the General Assembly. He talked about the goals his administration set seven years ago and praised Marylanders for the progress they've made in health care, education and the economy. But he also told members of the General Assembly that there's more to be done.

"The state of our state is strong and is growing stronger by the day," said Governor Martin O'Malley.

During O'Malley's final State of the State address, he outlined the goals and achievements from the past seven years under the O'Malley-Brown administration.

"Our goals as an administration have remained constant and true, to strengthen and grow the ranks of our middle class including our family owned business and our family farms, to improve public safety and public education and to expand opportunity to more people rather than fewer," said O'Malley.

O'Malley said he wanted a government that was accountable for its actions and discussed how they set 16 strategic goals to improve Maryland's progress in areas like jobs creation, education, security and health care.

"Not only is Maryland stronger than before," said O'Malley. "Maryland is cleaner, smarter, safer, healthier, more entrepreneurial, more competitive than she was before the recession hit."

And to grow the economy, O'Malley says it has to start with growing the middle class and raising the minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 by 2016. And it's a topic that some residents support.

"That would help a lot because I feel like we all work too much and we don't get paid enough," said Felicia Rockenbaugh, a Frederick resident.

"For me, even though it is a retail clerk, I gotta pay somebody well enough so they can survive and do a good job for me. If I'm paying right at the minimum wage I don't feel like I get the quality employees that I need," said Richard Bailey, store owner at Earthly Elements in downtown Frederick.

Currently, 21 states have higher minimum wage rates than Maryland.

Local lawmakers have sponsored a bill that would allow minimum wage to be determined on a county by county basis.

Governor O'Malley ended his address with the future he wanted to see in Maryland, pushing for a greener economy and continued job creation.

If Maryland legislators raise the minimum wage it would be the first increase since 2009.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

More Headlines