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Organization Brings Lyme Disease Awareness to Community

There’s a new recourse in the community for people battling Lyme disease. "My Lymelight" is helping people understand the disease and some in the group are sharing what they’ve learned with others, after facing it themselves.
FREDERICK, Md. - Doctors say when you’re out in the woods it’s important to check yourself after for any bites or ticks. Lyme disease is the most common disease in the county transmitted through insects such as ticks, mosquitoes and fleas, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Statistics show the disease is widespread in the Four State area, and one local woman who has suffered from it is now helping others.

“I was sick six years and ended up being totally debilitated,” said Dr. Linda Potts, a victim of Lyme Disease.


“My Lymelight” is a new resource in he community helping to spread knowledge about the disease. The organization held its first conference Sunday, a panel of Doctors spoke to the public, sharing information they say has been underestimated.

"Just recently the CDC, which was saying there were 30,000 new cases a year just suddenly modified and said no, we we’re wrong it's 300,000. I suspect they’re wrong again and there may be three million,” said Dr. Norton Fishman.

The doctors at the conference say the symptoms can range from minor to traumatic, and that people can have Lyme disease for years without knowing it.  

“You can carry the infection and not be real sick and then suddenly explode if you get a trauma or you can get sick immediately, what we’re finding is people have fatigue that makes no sense,” said Dr. Fishman.

Dr. Linda Potts shared her story, she says the disease took over her life for several years and now that she knows what it’s all about, she helping to spread the information to others.


“People can understand there are other people that understand it that have it, and we want to bring more knowledge, education to the local people for them to understand how devastating this can be to somebody,” said Dr. Potts.


According to the latest reports from the CDC, 95 percent of the cases reported came from 13 states, that includes Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Maryland.




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