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Police Stress Safety on Roadways as Rainy Weather Continues

“Motorist try to avoid the collisions by applying there breaks, however if they're too close and the surface is wet, they end up colliding with other vehicles because the stopping distance is not enough,” said Sgt. Jay Brown, Frederick Police Department
FREDERICK COUNTY, Md. - Police say they were slammed Thursday responding to accidents in Frederick County, Maryland. There were several accidents on Route 340 alone. Officials say some of the collisions could have been avoided if drivers were just a little bit more careful in the rain.

“Motorists try to avoid the collisions by applying their breaks, however if they're too close and the surface is wet, they end up colliding with other vehicles because the stopping distance is not enough,” said Sgt. Jay Brown, Frederick Police Department

At least one collision involved a car getting rear ended. Police say that’s why it’s so important to leave enough room for the car in front of you, and it’s also important to keep your vehicle properly maintained.

"Windshield wipers and your windshield are clean, and you have proper vision and your vehicle is in proper working order,“ said Sgt. Brown.

Some drivers say it’s harder for them to see in the rain, making it the most difficult weather condition for them to drive in.

“I'll be on the verge of pulling over and sometimes I don't. It's really pretty dangerous, but I guess I've been lucky. We need rain, it's a good thing, maybe just don't go out at all if you don't like driving in the rain,” said Rob Guthridge, of Frederick.

According to the Federal Highway Administration, 25 percent of all crashes that occur are weather related. They say more than 7,000 people are killed each year and nearly 630,000 are injured in weather related crashes. Statistics also show 75 percent of those weather related crashes happen on wet pavement and more than 45 percent during rainfall, compared to nearly 15 percent during snow, and an even smaller percentage happening on icy pavement.

“Give the vehicles ahead of you enough room and yourself enough room so you have a way out, so you're not following too close, and also reduce your speed so you can react appropriately, should anything happen in front of you,” said Sgt. Brown.

And of course always watch out for pedestrians, all they’ve got protecting them are umbrellas and rain boots.

 



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