50°F
Sponsored by

W.Va. State Police Needs More Troopers

Not just here, but all over West Virginia, state police officials are addressing the need for additional funding to recruit and train troopers throughout the state.

EASTERN PANHANDLE, WV- Troopers with the West Virginia State Police says they need some more man power to serve and protect the eastern panhandle. Faced with being understaffed, they are asking the Mountain State for assistance and hoping more new troopers will join their force.

Over the past few years, Corporal J.S. Chumley of the West Virginia State Police says it's been tough for him to properly protect and serve the citizens, because he's asked to take on multiple police cases, due to the lack of troopers in the eastern panhandle.  

"It happens a lot more than people realize. We'll be on one call then have to postpone, come back and deal with them later because another call is going on.  It's in process and is more serious in nature," said Chumley.

Not just here, but all over West Virginia, state police are addressing the need for additional funding to recruit and train troopers throughout the state. Plus, they say they are encouraging people to join the agency. Captain Robert Blair, the commander of all our local barracks say the need for new troopers is greater than ever.   

"Being understaffed puts a strain on my troopers because we are expected to be out on I-81, making sure everyone is obeying the construction zone and speed limits, which is a very serious matter.  We had a lot of complaints out there," said Capt. Blair.

Blair says there is a need for more minority troopers. They are also hoping for troopers who can speak Spanish to help communicate with the community's growing Hispanic population. 

"We do have a large Hispanic population here in the eastern panhandle and the surrounding areas.  That would be very beneficial to have a Spanish speaking officer or several," said Capt. Blair.

Blair says another issue is the low pay for the troopers.  Blair says it's a reason why people are joining other law enforcement agencies instead of West Virginia State Police.  He says they're now working with state legislators in coming up with a higher salary to entice recruits.

"Jefferson County's probably one of the most expensive counties in the state of West Virginia to purchase a home or a property and that's always an issue for troopers in the salaries they make.  Not only for troopers, but I have civilian support personnel that quite frankly there pay is horrible," said Capt. Blair.

Click here for more information about the West Virginia State Police Department. 

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

More Headlines